Kiwanis4Kids — Donations to Assist Ka`ala Elementary

Donation boxes designed by Desiree Pacariem, BJ Ramel, and Enrique Sanchez.

Leilehua High School Key Club participated in this
year’s Kiwanis 4 Kids event by creating and collecting
donation boxes. Faculty Advisor, Amber Nakamura,
designed the flyers and provided boxes to ten Key Club
members. Each student was responsible for decorating
their box, finding a designated collection site, and asking their friends and family for donations. Key Club members Zaedyn Pagaduan, Shayne Llarinas, and BJ Ramel collected the most donations. Shayne and BJ placed their boxes in classrooms around campus, and asked their classmates and teachers for donations. Zaedyn placed her box in her mother’s workplace at M. Dyer and Sons in Pearl City; and they provided Zaedyn with lots of generous donations. After, a couple of weeks, each student brought in their boxes to sort through all the donations, and give the donations to Kiwanis member, Susie Wong.

Left: Key Club Member Leilani Kanagawa helped sort
through donations brought by Shayne and Zaedyn.

 

 

The LHS Key Club members consider this a successful contribution because of their generous family and friends. They were pleasantly surprised and humbled at how kind and giving people can be when asked.
They can’t wait to do this again!
– Amber Nakamura, LHS

Kiwanis 4 Kids

Aladdin Roque-Dangaran

As the school year ends, I feel that this would be a good time to remind our members, student leaders, and the community about why we do what we do. At least for me, I joined the K-Family and chose a career in education as a way to give back to my community. But teachers do not teach to just feed students information. We, as Kiwanians do not just sponsor our student leaders and let them do whatever they want. Our purpose is to build a legacy of passion. Teachers are meant to help build students up so that they are able to find their passion in life and have the knowledge and skills needed to pursue it. As Kiwanians, we are building young leaders that can one day complete the cycle of service and inspire new leaders in their community. Like all legacies, they all have the possibility to crumble. But what keeps them strong is the passion that the members have for it; for what they do; for what they believe in. So, I challenge you to keep this legacy going strong over the summer. Yes, as Kiwanians, it may be easy, but what about your student leaders? They are in vacation mode! But yet it is our duty to help them keep that passion strong throughout these next three months so that they are even stronger once they go back to school.
Kiwanis4Kids Collection — During the month of April we had our first collection for our Kiwanis4Kids project. We originally started this project to donate school supplies and canned foods to Title 1 schools (schools that have majority families with low SES). The first school that we picked was Ka`ala Elementary School in Wahiawa, and it was a success. Leilehua High School Key Club donated about 3 full boxes of school supplies and canned foods. When I went to drop off the donations at Ka`ala, Vice Principal Mr. Wetzel was surprised and grateful for how much was collected. Part of the reason I feel that this project was successful is because it was for something within Leilehua’s community and some of the Key Clubbers may have had siblings or relatives attending that school. This just goes to show that people will be more invested in what they are doing when it becomes meaningful for them.

What Can We Do to Ensure Clean Energy by 2045?

Hannah Shipman

Hannah Shipman with Blue Planet Foundation was our speaker at our May 1 general meeting. Hannah graduated from Seabury Hall and England’s University of Canterbury. Hannah studied conservation and environment which prepared her for Blue Planet Foundation.
The Foundation is working to have Hawaii be 100% renewable energy by 2045. Currently, Hawaii is 80% dependent on coal and oil.
Blue Planet teaches awareness and advocacy. It has two programs that teach our young people on saving energy and being good stewards.
Here are some simple things you can do to start saving immediately:
✓ wash clothes with COLD water
✓ don’t peek in your oven; the temperature drops 25°F with each peek
✓ turn off lights when you leave the room
✓ watch your small appliances; they may be big energy wasters

– Susan Wong

Recognition of Service and Leadership Transition

Division 22 Komohana held their monthly DCM and Year-End Celebration on Sat, April 28 at the Jikoen Hongwanji Temple. Castle, Damien, Kailua, Mililani, Pearl City and Waipahu were present.

2018-19 LTG Halia called her first DCM to order at 5:26pm. She reviewed service hours and membership for last year, Division fundraiser goals for the new year, Spotlight on Service themes for April and May.

She announced election results from DCON:
CNH Treasurer: Kara Yoshiyama (Hilo)
CNH Secretary: Zoe Yao CNH
Governor: Jonathan Lum

LTG Halia announced Komohana April recognition:
Club of the Month: Kailua
Member of the Month: Zoe Hamada, Damien
Officer of the Month: Caid Aquino, Sec, Kailua

LTG Halia is looking for fill her division leadership team with two executive assistants, one division newsletter editor, and one technology coordinator. Anyone interested should complete the Application and Agreement to Serve.

Immediate Past Komohana LTG Keith presented awards that were given out at the 2018 DCON in Nevada. Congratulations to all NINE Komohana Key Clubs on your commitment to building your home, school, and community.
LTG Keith thanked her 2018-19 Division Leadership Team (Lina, Halia, Keith, Rhesel) for making the year a distinguished one.

All nine Komohana Key Clubs received certificates and banner patches for various annual awards such as member retention, membership growth, 100% on-time MRF submission, etc.

 

 

Joel Tabangcura did a BANG up job as advisor that he received the Division 22 Advisor of the Year Award. He proudly wore his medallion. Congrats Joel.

 

 

 

 

*** A first for Division 22 ***
Congratulations to THREE Distinguished 2017-18 LTGs Keith(K), Erica(H), Kara(M)

USS Missouri with Mililani Key Club

The Mililani Key Club joined us for our monthly workday on board the USS Missouri. It was a busy day on Ford Island with a huge garage sale, several ships anchored in the harbor, and ceremony on the fantail of the Mighty Mo. We were able to cut, drill, sand, stamp, varnish, and adorn teak bookmarks. The Kapolei Rotary was also on board and want to do bookmarks for their next service project. Left, Past LTG Neil Yamamoto was sharing memories of his high school education with Mililani key clubbers— Boreas, Stephanie, Lina, and Cassidy.

Why Volunteer?

Aladdin Roque-Dangaran

This semester at the University of Hawaii at Manoa I decided to take a course in Developmental Psychology. In this class we have learned not only the different theories of how our minds develop from an infant to an adult but also how we learn (and how we best learn) during each stage of our lives. One of the readings that I read talked about how our social and emotional mindsets change as we get older[1]. And in this article, one of the interesting findings was that “older people who engage in volunteer activities that are either socially or mentally demanding also perform better on cognitive tasks than do older adults engaged in solitary activities with low cognitive demands”[1]. And I don’t have to tell you that the members of Kiwanis are some of the most active people you will ever meet. During my time in Circle K International at Washington State University I was invited to go to the Kiwanis Club of Pullman’s weekly meetings. And I believe that, at that time, their oldest member was about 95 years old! And when she spoke and you talked with her, she was still pretty sharp! Every member of Kiwanis is goal driven towards the well-being of others. And this type of mindset, combined with being active in the community and a leader to our Student Leadership Programs, can help to keep our mind ‘all there’ as we begin to age.

[1] Charles, S. T. and Carstensen, L. L. Social and Emotional Aging. The Annual Review of Psychology. 2009. 61, 383-409.

 

Trauma Dolls in Many Colors and Prints

The Kiwanis Club of Pearl Harbor inherited a service project started by the Kiwanis Club of West Oahu. West Oahu began making trauma dolls that would be donated to the children’s ward at local hospitals. The completion of these dolls became a service project for our members on April 3. Susie brought the sewing equipment and polyfill to stuff the dolls. It was a great meeting where members were able to work on the dolls while discussing future service projects, current events, and getting to know each other a little better.
We are putting the finishing touches on 38 dolls and they will be donated to Kaiser Permanente’s Child Life Services Dept, along with preemie beanies.
These dolls are used to explain medical procedures that pediatric patients will be receiving. The doll helps the child to better understand what’s ahead and even feel more in control.
Angelita Juan, Child Life Services Coordinator at Kaiser Permanente will be our guest speaker on June 12. Please join us to learn more about what programs they offer our Keiki.

USS Missouri with Leilehua Key Club

We were given a variety of tasks—replenishing the supplies in the volunteer backpacks and cleaning/dusting/sweeping the Broadway corridor and its adjacent rooms. The battleship is being prepared for their annual inspection by Navsea (Naval Sea Systems Command), the owner of the USS Missouri. Our monthly Missouri workdays provides the opportunity for service for young Daniel (Past Div 22 Key Club LTG Harmony Nakamura’s son) and our Kiwanis Club members.

2018 HCON — Through the Eyes of Three Generations

Region 18 Division 22 HCON Happily Ever After was held March 9-11 at the Maui Beach Hotel. Here are reviews from Waipahu Senior Angela, faculty Advisor Jackie Meggs, and Kiwanis Advisor Carol Smith.

Continue reading “2018 HCON — Through the Eyes of Three Generations”

Building Servant Leaders

Aladdin Roque-Dangaran

During the past two summers, another Leilehua band alumnus and I have organized a leadership camp for the band leaders. Some of the lessons that we emphasized during the camp were Service and Fellowship; service in the sense that because they are leaders they have a responsibility to be servants to the band. Because they are leaders, they have to sacrifice more to create a better program. The hard part was getting them to convince themselves that they need to sacrifice more: not because they have to, but because they want to. We wanted to make them feel the same passion and dedications to the program that we had and still have. And once that passion is built it will be easier to create bonds of fellowship in their program.
This is exactly what Kiwanis does for the children of the world. We are building student leaders by engaging them in community projects. We are not hand-feeding them service projects. Rather, we are getting them involved in the process–they are looking for their own projects and organizing them themselves. By engaging them at this level, we hope that they develop a sense of civic responsibility; that in order to make difference in the world, you may have to sacrifice something. But what really matters is that they willing to sacrifice their time, make donations, etc. The world needs to be filled with more people who WANT to serve and give their time to make a difference. And that is what we teach our students.