ACRONYMS GALORE—CLE, DCM, SP, LTG, SLP, DCON, CNH, KI, ETC.

The 2018 CLE Training was hosted by incoming LTG Greg Peros (Maui) The CLE Trainer was current Trustee John Buck (Kahului). In attendance were Kiwanis leaders from Alaka`i Young Professionals, East Hawaii, Kahului, Kailua Kona (via Skype), Kaneohe, Maui, Pearl Harbor and Valley Isle. It was a great day of learning, networking and team building. And by the end of the day, everyone knew the meaning of each of the acronyms above.

 

Incoming LTG Greg shared 2018-19 International (Year of the “Ing”), District (Heart of the Hero) and Division goals. We are excited for the upcoming year.

Region 18 Trustee John will end his 3-year term on Sept 30, 2018. Current CNH Foundation Director Richard Minatoya was elected Region 18 Trustee for 2018-2021.

 

 

Past Division 22 LTG Joshua Chang set up special equipment to be able to post the CLE onto YouTube as well as engage Kailua Kona via Skype.

 

 

Greg had us thinking outside the box or perhaps “outside the tarp” with an activity that required us to flip our tarp over without touching the floor.
Current LTG Roy Kagawa held his final DCM for 2017-18. Before the DCM was over, Joel Tabangcura (Alaka`i) was elected LTG for the term 2019-2020. Joel joined the meeting via Skype to accept the nomination.
Thank you LTG Roy and Trustee John for your service to Division 22 / Region 18.

USS Missouri Workday with Waipahu Key Club

 

Our monthly workday on the USS Missouri was with the Waipahu and Pearl City Key Clubs. We cut, drilled, sanded, stamped (Vicky in photo), oiled, and refinished many teak bookmarks. We reworked many bookmarks that were rejected by our quality control crew. These were bookmarks that were finished by other groups.
We helped to put up the welcome banner for RIMPAC. The Rim of the Pacific Exercise, is the world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise. RIMPAC is held biennially during June and July of even-numbered years from Honolulu, Hawaii. This year, China was excluded and the Army and Air Forces were added to the exercises.

Oahu Key Club Officer Training Conference (OTC) and DCM

Komohana and Hikina held an all-Oahu OTC on Sat June 9 at Farrington High School. The day started at 7:15a with breakfast provided by the Kiwanis Club of Honolulu. Komohana LTG Halia and Hikina LTG Lawrence planned the day’s events starting with the OTC at 8:00am. Officer workshops were interspersed Team Building activities. Lunch was provided by Alakai, Kaneohe, and Pearl Harbor. Kaneohe Kiwanian Craig Yamada took care of the food preparation! Hikina and Komohana held separate DCMs at 3:00pm. The day adjourned at 4:00pm with clean up for the library, classrooms, and cafeteria. Thank you Farrington for hosting the 2018 OTC.
Komohana welcomes the Kapolei High School Key Club. Five officers attended the OTC. Alakai will be their sponsoring Kiwanis Club and Lori Morimoto will be their Kiwanis Advisor. That brings the total of Komohana Key Clubs up to 10.

Front left: LTG Halia and Charter President Michelle.

The Adolescent Brain

Aladdin Roque-Dangaran

During this past semester at UH at Manoa I took a class in developmental psychology. One of the more interesting topics that we learned about was the development of the adolescent. Many of us work with high school key clubbers. And to many of them, we are more than just advisors or chaperones. We often create personal bonds with our students in which they trust us and we trust them. Prior to neuroscience, and even today, there was a stigma about adolescence as being a period of ‘raging hormones.’ However, we now know that the surging hormones doesn’t tell the whole story. According to Steinberg (2011), the “maturation of the brain systems responsible for thinking ahead and controlling impulses is influenced by the sorts or experiences young people have.” Because the plasticity of the brain is at its peak during adolescence, what we experience can heavily influence the way our brain matures and develops. The connections that we form with our SLP, no matter how small it may seem, to them it can mean the world. I have had many a student just sit in my office and ‘vent’ to me. And as an adult it is easy to just push them away because it may seem like they are just complaining. But for many of those students they needed to just have a release to get them through their day. And it is not because they are ‘moody,’ but because their brains are trying to cope with the world around them, and we as educators can help push their brains in the right direction.
Sternberg, L. (2011). Demystifying the Adolescent Brain. Educational Leadership.
– Aladdin Roque-Dangaran, Pres

Kiwanians – Therapy Dolls – Preemie Caps — Child Life Specialists

What do these four things have in common? LOVE! There is the love of serving, which Kiwanis shows us. There is the love in the hands that cut patterns, sew and stuff these unique therapy dolls with their different colors, fabrics and attitudes, as well as the hands that tenderly crocheted the tiny preemie caps. The Child Life Specialists exuded love in all they do for children. The Kiwanis Club of Pearl Harbor met two dedicated women, as guest speakers at our June meeting.

Continue reading “Kiwanians – Therapy Dolls – Preemie Caps — Child Life Specialists”

USS Missouri—Ready with a Plan B

On May 26, our monthly workday on board the Mighty Mo was with the Pearl City Key Club. Originally scheduled to help prepare beds on the second deck, we were reassigned as the floors were being refinished. We tackled finishing teak bookmarks—sanding, stamping, varnishing, and adding the tie. During the summer break, our workdays will be open to all of our SLPs.

Kiwanis4Kids — Donations to Assist Ka`ala Elementary

Donation boxes designed by Desiree Pacariem, BJ Ramel, and Enrique Sanchez.

Leilehua High School Key Club participated in this
year’s Kiwanis 4 Kids event by creating and collecting
donation boxes. Faculty Advisor, Amber Nakamura,
designed the flyers and provided boxes to ten Key Club
members. Each student was responsible for decorating
their box, finding a designated collection site, and asking their friends and family for donations. Key Club members Zaedyn Pagaduan, Shayne Llarinas, and BJ Ramel collected the most donations. Shayne and BJ placed their boxes in classrooms around campus, and asked their classmates and teachers for donations. Zaedyn placed her box in her mother’s workplace at M. Dyer and Sons in Pearl City; and they provided Zaedyn with lots of generous donations. After, a couple of weeks, each student brought in their boxes to sort through all the donations, and give the donations to Kiwanis member, Susie Wong.

Left: Key Club Member Leilani Kanagawa helped sort
through donations brought by Shayne and Zaedyn.

 

 

The LHS Key Club members consider this a successful contribution because of their generous family and friends. They were pleasantly surprised and humbled at how kind and giving people can be when asked.
They can’t wait to do this again!
– Amber Nakamura, LHS

Kiwanis 4 Kids

Aladdin Roque-Dangaran

As the school year ends, I feel that this would be a good time to remind our members, student leaders, and the community about why we do what we do. At least for me, I joined the K-Family and chose a career in education as a way to give back to my community. But teachers do not teach to just feed students information. We, as Kiwanians do not just sponsor our student leaders and let them do whatever they want. Our purpose is to build a legacy of passion. Teachers are meant to help build students up so that they are able to find their passion in life and have the knowledge and skills needed to pursue it. As Kiwanians, we are building young leaders that can one day complete the cycle of service and inspire new leaders in their community. Like all legacies, they all have the possibility to crumble. But what keeps them strong is the passion that the members have for it; for what they do; for what they believe in. So, I challenge you to keep this legacy going strong over the summer. Yes, as Kiwanians, it may be easy, but what about your student leaders? They are in vacation mode! But yet it is our duty to help them keep that passion strong throughout these next three months so that they are even stronger once they go back to school.
Kiwanis4Kids Collection — During the month of April we had our first collection for our Kiwanis4Kids project. We originally started this project to donate school supplies and canned foods to Title 1 schools (schools that have majority families with low SES). The first school that we picked was Ka`ala Elementary School in Wahiawa, and it was a success. Leilehua High School Key Club donated about 3 full boxes of school supplies and canned foods. When I went to drop off the donations at Ka`ala, Vice Principal Mr. Wetzel was surprised and grateful for how much was collected. Part of the reason I feel that this project was successful is because it was for something within Leilehua’s community and some of the Key Clubbers may have had siblings or relatives attending that school. This just goes to show that people will be more invested in what they are doing when it becomes meaningful for them.